1994 H-D VR1000

The origins of the V-Rod

1994 H-D VR1000

At the famed Daytona 200 in 1994, Harley-Davidson threw down the gauntlet to the AMA Superbike world.

The company showed up with its first all-new road-racing design since the 1970s and up-and-coming Miguel Duhamel at the controls.

The VR1000 was a radical departure for Harley, a company known for slower-revving, push-rod motors in its streetbikes and its stalwart XR750 dirt-trackers.

The motor was still a V-twin, but just about everything else, from the massive beam frame to the overhead cams, water cooling and fuel injection, was new to the orange and black. Hopes were high that Harley, in the unfamiliar role of underdog, could compete head-to-head against high-revving four-cylinder Japanese superbikes and established European racing twins.

Initial impressions were promising. In its first race at Daytona, Duhamel started the VR 68th on the grid and steadily moved up to 20th. When the counter-balancer came apart on lap 22, the machine had lasted more than 78 miles—16 miles more than it’d need in the usual 62-mile Nationals. Even more impressive, Duhamel had run laps in the 1-minute, 54-second range, not far off the pace of the leaders.

The bike continued to show flashes of competitiveness in its first season, with Duhamel finishing third at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. But in the years that followed, the VR’s early promise was never fulfilled.

Though its initial horsepower and handling targets put it in the ballpark compared to the Japanese bikes, the development of rival machines outpaced the efforts of Harley’s factory team and independent tuners working on privateer VRs, like this one, ridden by Tripp Nobles.
Though the VR project was canceled in 2001, it did yield results. Harley applied what it learned in the crucible of competition to a new street motorcycle launched in 2002: the landmark V-Rod.

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Engine
Double overhead cam 60-degree
V-twin
four valves per cylinder


Displacement
61 cubic inches (1,000cc)

Transmission
Five-speed
chain drive

Brakes
Dual disc front
single disc rear

Owner
Benji’s Harley-Davidson

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