AMA Charter Requirements

Motorcycle organizations are often independent organizations of motorcycle owners and enthusiasts who join together for many different reasons, including recreational and social activities, performing community service or to run organized events. Though they frequently pursue these ends on an independent basis, often they voluntarily affiliate themselves with the AMA by getting an AMA charter.

To establish a successful working relationship between the AMA and a chartered organization, both parties must have the same goals and objectives. Therefore, we ask that every charter adopt the mission to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling.

However, it’s not enough just to promote the interests of motorcyclists. A motorcycle organization must exist in two worlds: motorcycling and non-motorcycling. A responsible organization is concerned with how it coexists with the community at large and, at the same time, must not be antagonistic or hostile toward other factions within the motorcycling community.

Charter applications are legal documents. Therefore, your president or principal officer is required to verify that the information provided on your charter application is accurate.

Visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Riding/Story/charter-with-the-ama to view the types of charters available, requirements for each and fees.

Also, please note that regardless of which month an AMA charter is processed in a calendar year, all charters expire on Dec. 31 of the year the application was approved and processed.

It’s recommended that you make a copy of any paperwork you forward to the AMA for your files.

If a contact e-mail address is supplied, you will receive an e-mail confirming your approved charter status and assigned AMA charter number. Additionally, chartered clubs receive an AMA Charter Certificate.

AMA Risk Management Video

If your organization is sanctioning events, the AMA Risk Management video must be viewed every year before your sanction can be approved.

Even if an accident occurs due to operator error, the fact that your group will be named in a lawsuit is likely. If a lawsuit is filed, your risk of losing the suit will likely be reduced if you document complete, correct information about the accident and can produce release forms, properly and legibly signed by each participant, that release your organization of responsibility. There are other ways you can show that you held a responsible event, therefore reducing your risk, such as displaying liability posters, holding riders meetings, etc.